The computer processor company AMD has announced an app store to bridge the prevalent gap in smooth running of the Android apps on the computer. This store will showcase how the apps will be optimized for its processors. With this, we will be able to download and run popular Android apps on AMD based PC running Windows. The joint efforts of Blue Stack and AMD have enabled the AMS AppZone Player which in turn has led to such possibilities.

amdlogo AMD bridges Android and PC gap

This is expected to be a big leap to bridge the gap and enabling the Android apps to be run on AMD-powered devices. With this collaboration, the software developers will now be able to easily tap AMD’s products and keep the great expectations of the users satisfied. Manju Hegde, corporate VP of heterogeneous applications and developer solutions at AMD confirmed the news.

Further, users will be able to download featured apps directly from the AppZone Player or search for the AppZone store. This collaboration is a success already and they are now planning and working with leading OEMs to preload the player on the upcoming AMD-powered devices.

We are waiting fingers crossed for more surprises. Thanks to AMD for the good news!

 

clip image002 thumb No Skype, Angry Birds, Tango & PES on Lumia 610

Lumia 610 has always been in news: from pre-launch till date, for various reasons. Although Windows Nokia suggests that the handset is well optimized for the 256 MB RAM and 800 MHz processor.

Recently Nokia Lumia 610 was in news for the wrong reason. The phone does not support Skype, video calling app Tango, famous Angry Birds and the football games PES on the handset.

Looking back to the days when Microsoft declared that only 5% of apps in the marketplace will not install on Tango handsets. Little was known that the best apps will fall in the category of this 5%, which could not be installed. Well, not that we know, we would only expect fair business with all the facts mentioned while purchasing the phone. This is tantamount to launching a phone just for the sake of it. Nokia has made great many errors during the Symbian days when it would senselessly release phone that were not upto the mark as per the market demand. With Windows Phone coming into the picture and a new leader taking charge, we had speculated that this “fever”of Nokia will finally die down. But we had speculated wrongly.

Samsung is doing a good job by keeping the galaxy lineup up to the mark. All low end Galaxies get the same treatment. Same goes wit the mid-end and high end Galaxies. With Lumia 610 and promises made by Nokia, we wonder if we are we asking too much?

 

Tablets are the future of tomorrow, so predicts Research2guidance, the analytical firm. According to a report published by them,

The number of new tablet app consumers increased by 58 million. As a result, tablet owners now constitute 8.6% of the installed app consumer base.

While in 2011,

apps in the Apple App Store for iPad grew 180% to more than 140,000 apps by the end of Q4 2011. While this cannot be easily quantified for Android as tablet apps are not separated out, the growth of niche stores and niche store categories focusing on Android tablets reflects their growing presence. For example, Archos Appslib focuses completely on Android tablet apps, while other stores like Android Tapp has a dedicated category.

During 2011, apps in the Apple App Store for iPad grew 180% to more than 140,000 apps by the end of Q4 2011. While this cannot be easily quantified for Android as tablet apps are not separated out, the growth of niche stores and niche store categories focusing on Android tablets reflects their growing presence. For example, Archos Appslib focuses completely on Android tablet apps, while other stores like Android Tapp has a dedicated category.

growth of tablet user base research2guidance thumb Tablet users to shape the future mobile app market

Also

Several studies have shown that tablet users exhibit different behavior towards app downloading/usage and mobile browsing than smartphone users.  Based on the breadth of use cases for gaming, ecommerce, digital publishing and the enterprise – tablet user growth is likely to have a marked effect on consumption in these areas.

In the enterprise, for example, tablets have already been largely implemented at upper levels of management and are quickly working their way throughout organizations – according to Apple’s CEO Tim Cook in 2012, 92% of Fortune 500 companies are testing or deploying iPads. As more and more use cases are developed and penetration increases, so too will the number of apps being developed for enterprise tablet users. While Apple has already carved out a niche section for iPad and iPhone Business users called “@Work”, other players like Lenovo and Cisco are trying to do the same for Android Business users.

But what about the likes of Galaxy note? The Phablet device which is quickly gaining momentum as the choice of device for user who want a tablet with smartphone functionality and vice versa…!!

 

Great News for Windows Phone fans. Windows Phone has edged out iPhone in China, as per Microsoft. Launched barely two months back, Windows Phone now has a market share of  percent, as  compared to iPhone which has a market share of 6 percent.

Michel van der Bel, Microsoft’s Chief Operating Officer for the Greater China Region predicts that the trend will continue. Bel feels that smartphones and upcoming Windows 8 Tablets would prove to be the key to Microsoft’s position in the competition.

While Microsoft highlighted the overwhelming success of Android in the Chinese region, it is confident that it will topple iPhone to take it’s spot in the region.

via

 

RIM has always offered secure platform to the enterprise customers and maintained their status through the years. The survey by Trend Micro compares different mobile platforms to suggest that the Blackberry scores highest among all to meet the demands of use in the enterprise.

The test parameters include a combination of factors from built-in security to application security, authentication, virtualization, device wipe and firewall.

Blackberry stood victorious at the highest average score of 2.89, followed by iOS at 1.7. Windows Phone stood close at 1.61 and Android managed a score of 1.37.

Raimund Genes, CTO of Trend Micro quoted:

Against the growing, unstoppable backdrop of consumerisation and BYOD, every mobile device is a risk to business. What is interesting in these results is that, whilst some mobile platforms have evolved very noticeably along enterprise lines, there is still a strong ‘consumer marketing’ legacy in some quarters and this is negating some of the progress made on the enterprise front. Indeed, some of the attributes we have examined in the report are still firmly ‘enterprise-unready’.

Trend Micro, Bloor Research and the researchers from Altimeter Group declared Blackberry as the best option for the most stringent mobile roles due to corporate-grade security and manageability.

Now that’s something no one can dare argue against…!!!

via

 

clip image001 Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

This is Lumia 900- in the teardown performed by the market research firm- IHS iSuppli.

The teardown determined the cost required to build the phone is $209.Now, this is the reason for the launch cost of $99.

Comparison between Nokia Lumia 900 and Samsung Galaxy SII –

clip image003 Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

clip image005 thumb Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

The credit of the low material cost goes to Nokia, Microsoft and Qualcomm. The processor was only $17 vs $22 used in the Android phones and 512 MB RAM vs 1GB used in the commonly used Android handsets. The cheaper Bluetooth saved $2.50 vs newer ones of the Android handsets.

Microsoft lowered the prices of Windows Phone OS considerably to $5 from $15 to make Nokia Lumia 900 phone available at $209.

Not much of a difference in the BOM of the two, but a big difference in retail price. Sammy can take a few hints from Nokia on pricing though…!!

 

clip image001 Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

This is Lumia 900- in the teardown performed by the market research firm- IHS iSuppli.

The teardown determined the cost required to build the phone is $209.Now, this is the reason for the launch cost of $99.

Comparison between Nokia Lumia 900 and Samsung Galaxy SII –

clip image003 Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

clip image005 thumb Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

The credit of the low material cost goes to Nokia, Microsoft and Qualcomm. The processor was only $17 vs $22 used in the Android phones and 512 MB RAM vs 1GB used in the commonly used Android handsets. The cheaper Bluetooth saved $2.50 vs newer ones of the Android handsets.

Microsoft lowered the prices of Windows Phone OS considerably to $5 from $15 to make Nokia Lumia 900 phone available at $209.

Not much of a difference in the BOM of the two, but a big difference in retail price. Sammy can take a few hints from Nokia on pricing though…!!

 

Microsoft and Nokia have been pretty busy pushing the Windows Phone. With AT&T coming into the picture, the game was quite clear – Lumia 900 was to be AT&T’s new flagship.

We all know that a flagship is something which the carrier/store pushes with all it’s might. But this is not the case with AT&T. As an article points out on CNET, who conducted a secret shopper survey of 5 AT&T stores in Manhattan. They did not find the Nokia Lumia 900 high on the list of recommended handsets. Here is what happened

…But when I asked for advice on buying a new smartphone, sales associates in five different stores in Manhattan actually recommended the Apple iPhone and not the carrier’s latest "hero" device.

Even when I prompted them to tell me more about the Lumia 900, none was willing to recommend it to me for purchase.

"Windows Phone is alright," said an associate in a store on the Upper West Side. "But it’s no iPhone."

This became clear to me when I walked into the AT&T stores and told each associate I encountered that I had never owned a smartphone but was looking to buy my first one. I explained I didn’t have any preconceived ideas about which device I wanted to buy. I told them I was a PC user, who knew little about cell phones and was looking for something easy to use. My main objective for owning a smartphone was to access email, surf the Web and check Facebook.

While all these activities could be easily achieved with a Windows Phone, associate after associate first pushed me to toward an iPhone and then suggested an Android device as my second option.

"For your first smartphone, you should get an iPhone," an assistant manager at an AT&T store told me. "When you get bored with that, you should try an Android phone."

When I asked him about the Lumia 900 and the Windows Phone OS for someone such as myself who had never had a smartphone, he told me he thought it was too complicated. He admitted he hadn’t used the Lumia 900 much. He had only gotten the device a couple of days before the launch on Sunday.

No wonder we will see competition on the east coast between Android and iPhone only.

 

When CNET got their hands on Windows Phone (Nokia Lumia 800 to be precise), they were simply awestruck by the balance the platform had to offer. The UI was, well, slick, but was a lot less clunky, as per CNET.

According to the article:

The king is dead

Until not so long ago, that meant Apple. But something insane has happened. Something that we simply wouldn’t have countenanced just three short years ago.

One company makes a beautiful, intuitive, elegant interface, and the other makes a dated, clunky interface. But now it’s Microsoft showing off the thing of beauty, and Apple that’s behind the times. Microsoft is the underdog and Apple is the monolithic, restrictive monopoly. Has the world gone mad?

Sure, the iPhone and iPad interface is still slick and simple. But the shine is gone — iOS 5 looks almost exactly the same as iOS 4. Android showed what you can do when you can truly customise the look and feel of your phone, with its flexible home screens, handy widgets placing information right at your fingertips, and the capacity to alter any feature you like.

I seem to recall an old story, when the only smartphone OS of the time, Symbian, was bashed by everyone. People wanted behemoths of phones. They worshipped a large screen and a powerful processor, only to realise that the duo would eat battery faster. They demanded an app store like no other, only to trial a few apps and then delete them and move on to the next.

Nokia was undeniably the game setter, Apple was the game changer, Android was the turmoil that uprooted everyone, and yet RIM et al were wondering what just happened. This proves the age old proverb – The only thing which is constant is change.

Source

 

Apple surely has a brand loyalty that every CEO yearns for. According to a research published by GfK,

Some 84 percent of iPhone users said they would pick iPhone also when they replace their cellphone, while 60 percent of consumers who use smartphones running Google’s Android said they would stick with phones using the same software.

Only 48 percent of people using Research In Motion’s cellphones said they would stay loyal to their BlackBerrys, the study showed.

While Apple is the leader at present, the current development on Android, RIM’s BBX and Windows Phones from Nokia are all set to give Apple a tough challenge, according to the report.

The scope for brands to lure customers from rivals has diminished and the richest rewards will go to those providers that can create the most harmonious user experience and develop this brand loyalty

What is noteworthy here that 70 percent of consumers said they would stick with their phones due to their seamless integration of features and access to content. The present and future undoubtedly belongs to the Apps and Internet.

Though the firm interviewed around 4500 people in various countries, it never mentions anything about Symbian or Windows Phones. This is quite surprising as a certain percentage of these 4500 people must be carrying Symbian and Windows phones, which the report fails to mention.

Source

 

Kantar Worldpanel ComTech has conducted a research on smartphone platforms in the UK and have found out that around half of the UK smartphones have Android of one kind or the other on them.

MBB reports

Android’s share has increased from 29 percent a year ago to 49.9 percent. HTC is leading the way for phone manufacturers using the OS, with 45 percent of Android-based phone sales in the 12 weeks prior to 2 October. Samsung took 38 percent of Android sales with Sony Ericsson contributing 8.5 percent, down from 20.5 percent a year ago.

RIM’s BlackBerry OS is the next most popular smartphone OS, present on 22.5 percent of UK smartphones while Apple’s iOS has 18.5 percent market share, down from 33 percent a year ago. Kantar’s figures were taken before Apple announced the iPhone 4S, a period during which Apple CEO Tim Cook said there had been a significant slowdown of iPhone sales.

While Nokia plummeted from 20 percent last year to 6 percent this year, It’s hopes to gain momentum through the Windows Phone is bleak as Windows Phone managed to bad only a measly 1.4 percent share.

The “bad news for featurephones” is that under half of the UK population (44 percent) owns smartphones, with the growth in sales quickly accelerating. Smartphones made up 69 percent of mobile phone sales during the period.

 

Analyst firm research2guidance has a published a report according to which, while the number of apps submitted to Android Market has passed the 500,000 mark, compared with 600,000 for Apple’s App Store, more than 37 percent of these have subsequently been removed – compared with just 24 percent removed from the App Store.

The report is as follows

The actual total number of applications published on the Android Market leapt to over 500,000 in September 2011. In the meantime, the Apple App Store stands at just over 600,000 successful submissions: just 20% more. But over 37% of the applications published were later removed from the Android Market for various reasons, whereas the Apple App Store has removed just 24% of published apps in comparison, as of the end of September.

Although Apple regularly cleans up its store from inappropriate or outdated content, its active application share still exceeds that of Android. It is likely that the more rigid application submission requirements prevent developers from publishing multiple trial or low quality applications whereas publishers in the Android Market place a lot of market testing, trials, demo and malware content. Over 78% of the apps removed from the Android Market were free, which could mean that publishers put more effort into the applications they place with the pay-per-download business model, thus ensuring that it is kept longer in store.

Android developers are significantly more productive than Apple’s. The average publisher on Android has placed more than 6 applications in the Market since launch, compared to just over 4 apps on average that have been published by iOS developers.

Over the past few months, the Android Market has been maintaining an exponential growth, but is still lagging behind the app store market leader, Apple. In Q3 of 2011, the number of active mobile applications in the Android Market stood at 319,161 compared to 459,589 in Apple App store.

Share of apps removed from application stores thumb More than 30 percent apps pulled down from Android Market, Windows Marketplace continues to be exploited

Regarding the Windows Marketplace, the report stated

The share of deactivated apps in the WP7 Marketplace today stands at just 13%. However WP7 Marketplace is a comparably young store and many publishers are still exploring its potential. Fifteen months after its launch (comparable to the WP7 store now), the Android Market similarly had 86% of its apps active and a significant application store clean-up didn’t get started until the end of 2010.

Though there is no mention of the Nokia Store (previously known as the OVI STORE), we can assure you that there are a lot of useless/rogue/low quality apps in it, and the removal percentage of apps from the Nokia Store is very less, when compared to Windows Marketplace.

 

You read it correct ladies and gentlemen. Andy Lees, President of Microsoft’s Mobile unit, in an interview with the Seattle Times, thinks that iOS and Android are making users to go in and out of the apps, but Windows Phones aims at a flowing, almost singular experience.

His views on the iPhone 4S

Q: Do you think the iPhone 4S (running on iOS 5) gives you an opening? Do you think they missed an opportunity there?

A: Yes I do. I think, from an end user’s experience on the software, there’s a lot of interesting reviews written comparing us to iOS 5 and the amount that we’ve got done in 11 months — so some people (are) making comparisons of pace.

Perhaps the biggest comparisons people are making is our people-centricity. The more capabilities we add into our phone, the more delightful it becomes to use because you seem to have more at your fingertips without this clutter and confusion of the other platforms.

From a pure hardware perspective, I was surprised they’re not giving the consumer more choice. People want a variety of different things.

Pertaining to Android, he thinks that

…Android is heading down this chaotic phase. We want to enable OEMs (original equipment manufacturers), we want to enable operators, but we don’t want chaos.

If you’ve used some of the (Android) phones, some of them are great, but some of them are not great. But it’s random. And it feels like, with some of them, that you’ve had several cooks in the kitchen trying to bake different things with the same thing. Whereas we have much more coherency in the totality of what somebody gets when they buy our phone.

Quite interestingly, on the $100 phone option, his views are as follows

Q: Do you expect consumers to be able to walk in this holiday season and see some nice options for Windows Phone for around $100?

A: Or below. The strategy I’m talking about here is choice, different price points, different geographies.

The other thing that people ask about is what’s happening in terms of the level of commitment that (manufacturers) have to promoting or marketing phones. (In terms of Nokia, which will be using Windows Phone exclusively on all its smartphones), they’re 100 percent betting on Windows Phone. They have more reach than anybody else in terms of selling phones. They directly and indirectly manage over 600,000 retail outlets.

Having them so committed to Windows Phone is going to be a fundamental element for us to not only have great hardware but also huge reach and breakthrough with the customer.

We think it’s (also) going to be an accelerant for other OEMs (including Samsung, which reached an agreement with Microsoft recently to cooperate in the development and marketing of Windows Phone, and HTC, which is increasing its sales and marketing commitment).

From whatever Mr Lees said, Windows Phone is definitely going to be the third ecosystem.

 

App store content leaders of today are not those of tomorrow, is what the research firm Distimo believes. According to DIstimo

…within this year, Android Market will overtake Apple’s App Store for iPhone to become the largest content market – while both will see growth, Android Market currently has the momentum. There is also a significant shift underway among the smaller stores, with Nokia’s Ovi Store set to slip from fourth place to sixth place, while Microsoft’s WP7 Marketplace will move from sixth to fourth.

Apple’s App Store for iPad is currently holding its third place, while RIM’s BlackBerry App World is holding station in fifth.

Noticeably, 4 percent of products on the App Store for iPhone feature in-app purchases, these account for 76 percent of revenue. Free apps with in-app purchases account for 52 percent of the total revenue, with paid apps with in-app purchasing accounting for 24 percent. The remaining 24 percent is generated by traditional paid apps.

Android is not far behind in this model. Android in-app purchases were only introduced in March 2011. 76 percent of the top-25 grossing US apps are free titles monetised through in-app purchases.

The growth of tablets meant that the content has to be suited to the tablet form factor. Though the featurephones will never be extinct, the smartphone use is inarguably on the rise, and so is the number of apps downloaded. The research pointed that North America, Europe and Asia are now “almost equal in size” in download terms.

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